The Paradox of Getting Lost to Be Found

As a kind of mini pilgrimage, the labyrinth engaged me in a body prayer that symbolized the journey within: I am walking; I know the path is secure, but I do not know where it will go or end; I grow weary and frustrated at times and want to jump out of the path, but I have to walk the entire length because it leads to God–to truth, to wholeness, to healing. There is a supreme irony in finding my way in a labyrinth, but it is an exercise of faith and trust that meets me where I am.

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Karen GonzalezComment
Women Are the First Liberators in the Exodus Story

God sends liberators to the Hebrews: The women are the first liberators. First, the midwives who cleverly defy Pharaoh’s order to kill all male Hebrew babies at birth. Then, a Levite mother who realizes she can’t hide her 3-month-old son any longer, so she puts him in a basket in the river. Soon, Pharaoh’s daughter finds Moses floating by, has compassion, and raises that leader of the people as her own. And finally, Miriam, Moses’ older sister who watches over him in the river.

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Karen GonzalezComment
The Power of Words to Shape Reality

As a lover of words, I have always found the description of Jesus as a word fascinating. When I was a young Christian, I found the whole concept curious and a bit confusing—the idea that a feathery light word could become flesh seemed incomprehensible. How could that be?

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Karen GonzalezComment